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Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

2 edition of Descartes" ontological argument as not identical to the causal arguments found in the catalog.

Descartes" ontological argument as not identical to the causal arguments

Robert Davis Hughes

Descartes" ontological argument as not identical to the causal arguments

a comment on the Imlay-Humber debate

by Robert Davis Hughes

  • 143 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published in Toronto .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Descartes, René, -- 1596-1650.,
  • Meditation -- Christianity.,
  • God -- History of doctrines.,
  • Priories.

  • Edition Notes

    Thesis (M.A.)--University of St. Michael"s College, 1974.

    Statementby Robert Davis Hughes, III.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination2 vol. in 1 ;
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19527319M

    And why does Descartes think he needs such and argument at this point in the text. Secondly, I will explain, in detail, the arguments that Descartes makes and how he comes to the conclusion that God does exist. Next, I will debate some of Descartes premises that make his argument an unsound one, including circular reasoning. An ontological argument is a philosophical argument for the existence of God that uses arguments fall under the category of the ontological, and they tend to involve arguments about the state of being or existing. More specifically, ontological arguments tend to start with an a priori theory about the organization of the universe. If that organizational structure is true, the.

    In the Meditations 1 Descartes presents two arguments for the existence of God: the argument from representative reality and the ontological argument. Elliot&Smith-Descartes-Sophiapdf Read/Download File Report Abuse. Rene Descartes' third meditation from his book Meditations on First Philosophy, examines Descartes' arguments for the existence of purpose of this essay will be to explore Descartes' reasoning and proofs of God's the third meditation, Descartes states two arguments attempting to prove God's existence, the Trademark argument and the traditional Cosmological argument.

    Perhaps one of the most famous ontological arguments presented was by St. Anselm () who was an Archbishop of Canterbury and Abbot of Bec. He presented his argument in his book Proslogion. Anslem’s expectation for his argument was for it to help him understand the nature of God, and possibly persuade a non-believer of the existence of. Descartes asserts the Causal Argument in that if a finite substance’s effect exists, there must be an infinite substance with the same level of effect. In simpler terms, if there is a heat boiling water, the heat must come of a substance with that amount of heat in it, and that something without enough heat will not boil the water (Skirry.


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Descartes" ontological argument as not identical to the causal arguments by Robert Davis Hughes Download PDF EPUB FB2

Descartes does not conceive of the ontological argument on the model of an Euclidean or axiomatic proof, in which theorems are derived from epistemically prior axioms and definitions.

On the contrary, he is drawing our attention to another method of establishing truths that informs our ordinary practices and is non-discursive. The Ontological Argument from Descartes to Hegel. Published: J and is packed with arguments and counter-arguments.

The book opens with a compact overview of the ontological arguments found in Anselm, the scholastics, Descartes, and Leibniz. Some of the arguments' exposition is a bit hard to follow. "If God is indeed identical to. Descartes' initial argument is fairly brief and self-explanatory: All that up to the present time I have accepted as most true and certain I have learned either from the senses or through the senses; but it is sometimes proved to me that these senses are deceptive, and it is wiser not to trust entirely to anything by which we have once been deceived.

Descartes argument here is that God’s mere Characteristic proves his existence, saying that for god to be perfect, he must exist, for actual existence is a perfection for existing is better than not to exist, so God would lack perfection or would not be perfect if he does not exist, therefore, the idea of a “God” that doesn’t exist is.

Descartes’ ontological argument, even when it was explained to me, and even as a theistic believer, still stuck me as unbelievably odd. But you. period” (Harrelson, The Ontological Argument from Descartes to Hegel, ). 3 Of course, there is not just one ontological argument—some authors have even themselves offered several ontological arguments.

Anselm himself, argues Nor-man Malcolm, put forward two distinct ontological arguments. Criticism of Descartes’ Ontological Argument A priest called Caterus responded to Descartes’ argument.

Caterus argued that the statement ‘If God exists then he is highest being’ was a tautology (the truth of the statement is self evident). But Caterus emphasised the word ‘if’. It was not illogical to say, ‘God does not exist.

Against the ontological argument, ____ reasoned that existence is not a property but a relationship between the thing conceived and the world. Immanuel Kant ____ is not an Eastern religious movement or practice that has found increasing appeal in the United States. Proof and perception: the context of the argumentum cartesianum --Refutations of atheism: ontological arguments in English philosophy, --Being and intuition: Malebranche's appropriation of the argument --An adequate conception: the argument in Spinoza's philosophy --Ontological arguments in Leibniz and the German enlightenment.

Descartes gives at least two arguments for God's existence. The first one, found in I, is a version of the ontological argument for God's existence.

Descartes' ontological argument goes as follows: (1) Our idea of God is of a perfect being, (2) it is more perfect to exist than not. Descartes ' Ontological Argument For The Existence Of God Words | 6 Pages. Shields Word Count: 10/30/ Descartes’ Ontological Argument for the Existence of God The Ontological Argument for the existence of God is an a priori argument that aims to demonstrate that God’s real-world existence follows necessarily from the concept of God.

The ontological argument is particularly faulty. Ontological arguments are common in the history of philosophy. The medieval philosopher St. Anselm gave a famous version of the ontological argument, and even Plato puts an ontological argument in Socrates' mouth in the Phaedo.

Nicolas Malebranche, Baruch Spinoza, and G.W. Leibniz all have their. An ontological argument is a philosophical argument, made from an ontological basis, that is advanced in support of the existence of arguments tend to refer to the state of being or specifically, ontological arguments are commonly conceived a priori in regard to the organization of the universe, whereby, if such organizational structure is true, God must exist.

Knopf, Inc., ), pp. The book cover describes the contents as an introduction which "teaches the student how to read a philosophic text critically." The argument has been neglected in favor of Thomistic versions of the causal argument.

Discussion can be found in standard works on Descartes but not widely elsewhere. Critically assess Descartes’ view of the soul (35 marks) Although, technically, Descartes is not on the specification as a named philosopher, his work is too important to ignore in the mind/body debate.

The essay below was hand written in 45 minutes (and subsequently typed up without alterations – save a few spelling corrections). Descartes causal argument 1) I have an idea of G-d in my mind (which exists as proven by the cogito) 2) The concept of G-d is a concept of something infinite and perfect etc.

Book C -- the unintentional book -- has little to do with either argument or persuasion. Rather, it is a study of the unexpectedly Spinozistic cast to Descartes' thought.

Descartes comes across as a philosopher for whom God can no longer be considered as a responsive personality with intentions but only as identical with the nature and necessity of things, laid down once and irrevocably for all time.

is common knowledge, I am sorry that Descartes, who is an outstanding original thinker, should be publishing this old stuff. Reply (1) •The arguments for doubting that Hobbes here accepts as valid are ones that I was presenting as merely plausible.

I wasn’t hawking them as novelties. In offering them, I had three purposes in mind. The purpose of this paper is twofold.

First, it aims at introducing the ontological argument through the analysis of five historical developments: Anselm’s argument found in the second chapter of his Proslogion, Gaunilo’s criticism of it, Descartes’ version of the ontological argument found in his Meditations on First Philosophy, Leibniz’s contribution to the debate on the ontological.

Rene Descartes - Machines, Animals, and Rational Beings (Discourse pt. 5) - Philosophy Core Concepts - Duration: Gregory B. Sadler 2, views. my body are not identical. Descartes is certainly committed to the premises of this argument: but that does not mean he thinks that they support the conclusion.

On this interpretation, the argument looks very weak. Consider analogous arguments, made in contexts involving ignorance. I. Descartes’ causal argument for the existence of God is necessary based on the statements he makes in the First Meditations when he adopts a skeptical mindset and doubts everything.

He finds it necessary to build his metaphysical and epistemological ideas on a logical platform and through his reasoning becomes certain of two things.Descartes’ ontological argument is an echo of the original ontological argument for the existence of God as proposed by St.

Anselm in the 11th century. To illustrate the background of the ontological argument, Anselm’s argument works within a distinct framework of ontology that posits the existence of God as necessity by virtue of its.